231 Front Street, Lahaina, HI 96761 [email protected] 808.123.4567

Month: June 2021

Moody and Elsom shirts to be auctioned for Poppy Appeal

first_imgRFU President Richard Appleby added: “The RFU is extremely proud to have the poppy on our England shirts for the match against Australia. Historically, we have a strong relationship with the Armed Forces and have the utmost respect for the Royal British Legion and the sacrifices servicemen make to keep us safe.”Community Fundraiser for the Royal British Legion, Graham Akins said: “It’s great to see both teams coming together for the Poppy Appeal. The money raised will help The Royal British Legion provide direct, practical support for our injured heroes and bereaved Armed Forces families. The past nine years of conflict have increased the need for the Legions welfare work.” The Royal British Legion currently spends over £1.4million a week – more than £200,000 a day – in its work helping around 160,000 members of the Armed Forces family – dependants, veterans and the bereaved. This year the Legion hopes to raise £36 million towards its works. England will pay their own special tribute to the Armed Forces and their families when they run out against Australia on November 13 at Twickenham during the Investec Internationals. Both England and Australia will wear special commemorative shirts with the iconic poppy image situated on the right sleeve to help promote The Royal British Legion poppy campaign. Martin Johnson’s men will be wearing their new dark grey and red away shirt for the first time, having previously worn change strips against both The Pacific Islanders in 2008 and Argentina in 2009.The decision to wear the poppy will help highlight the Poppy Appeal, which this year is focusing on the need to help the generation of the Armed Forces and their families currently involved and affected by the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq.A range of events have been arranged for the day; a poppy montage will be shown on the big screen during the National Anthems, players will observe a moments silence before kick-off and the Royal British Legion will have 30 cadets collecting for the appeal around the concourse of the stadium.England Team Manager Martin Johnson is delighted to throw his support behind the campaign and said: “The armed forces have and continue to do a superb job and it is essential that we recognise and appreciate all of their efforts and those of The Royal British Legion. We are honoured to be wearing the poppy on our shirts in honour of those who have died and given so much for their country.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Keith Earls – The Irish speedster

first_imgInjuries have seen Earls feature on the wing for Ireland in this RBS 6 Nations. While he’s happy to be back in a starting shirt after an injury lay-off of his own saw his form dip last season, it’s the No 13 jersey that he’s set his heart on – and that just happens to be in the possession of a stubborn incumbent: captain Brian O’Driscoll.“Because I can play a few positions you tend to get the No 22 jersey,” says Earls. “You’re a jack of all trades but a master of none, and it’s very frustrating. Drico’s been around a long time now and people are starting to say he’ll be retiring shortly, but the man is fresh as a daisy. He’s great to have around. You learn so much off him and he’s keen to help, even though he’s Leinster and I’m Munster!”Earls has one of the biggest games of his career to look forward to this month – against England at the Aviva Stadium. Although the visitors could be travelling with the hopes of winning their first Six Nations title in eight years, Earls has no qualms about ruining their plans. “It’s a massive game but we’ll try to spoil any party,” says Earls. “A lot of people are being negative about the way we play but we’re close to putting in a big performance. You could see in the first few minutes against France that we really had them under pressure. If we keep the ball in hand, we’re going to score a lot more tries.”England had better watch out for Earls’s electric pace then.This article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine Keith with Lions’ teammates Ronan O’Gara and Donncha O’CallaghanKeith Earls endures a personal nightmare every other weekend. He hates flying. The big planes that transport Ireland are manageable, but the small, cramped ones that take Munster to various Magners League destinations at all hours of the day and night make Earls feel claustrophobic. When the story of the recent Cork plane crash broke, he was with his room-mate Tomás O’Leary, who shares his phobia, in the Ireland camp. The news hardly did wonders for their confidence.One person Earls would trust at the helm of a plane, however, is another Ireland team-mate, Tommy Bowe. Earls admits that the winger, who is learning to fly, would be a good person to have around in the event of the pilot being unable to land them safely. Such trust is something that all good rugby teams have in abundance, and the bond players share is one thing the sport is known – and loved – for. Those values have featured throughout Earls’s life and have helped him to carve out a successful sporting career.To say that school was not for Earls is an understatement. He had no interest in sitting in classrooms all day and when he did attend lessons he used to daydream about sport throughout. So he was constantly in hot water for offences from not handing in his homework to shaving his hair off against school regulations.When something made him tick, however, Earls was hooked. He enjoyed working with his hands and in woodwork classes he was the picture of concentration. He loved sport, too. Born in Moyross, he grew up a stone’s throw from Thomond Park and could be found there most days after school kicking a rugby ball. Soccer was a keen pastime too, but rugby eventually won his heart. That should come as little surprise for rugby was the sport played by his greatest hero – his father, Young Munster’s Ger Earls.Earls junior even had a spell in the No 7 jersey when he was 13 in an attempt to be just like his dad. But he was never flanker material and was reluctantly persuaded to switch to centre. “I played every sport I could but I was getting burnt out. I was always asleep!” says Earls of his childhood. “So my father said I should pick a sport I liked and concentrate on that. I just wanted to be like my father. It’s a bit cheesy, but I used to look up to him so much and I loved watching him play.”Earls dreamt of playing for Ireland but didn’t believe it was a realistic aim, so after leaving school he accepted a job working alongside Thomond’s captain Eddie Fraher as an electrician. The club was in the second division at the time and a number of top-flight teams were interested in Earls, but Fraher had offered him the job on the condition that he stayed put and he was happy to accept the bonus of paid work.A member of the Munster Academy, Earls had already made a few starts for Munster A when Declan Kidney called him up to the senior squad. But that meant time away from work and missing pay cheques, so it was with relief, as well as delight, that he signed his first development contract. And as soon as Earls waved goodbye to a career as an electrician, he became an integral part of the Munster – and Ireland – squads. “It all happened so fast,” he recalls. “It was only my first season playing for Munster and I ended up getting capped for Ireland and playing for the Lions. It was surreal. My first year of playing rugby was probably the best year I’d ever had.” Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Pro’s playbook: chip to score

first_imgDownload the PDF HERE, and take it to training. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Forget the cross-field kick, a little dink over the top of a defence can lead to a score! That’s the view of former England head coach Brian Ashton, who told you just how to set up such a move in the March edition of Rugby World. Chip away!last_img

Auckland Blues to host first Super Rugby match in Samoa

first_img“That generation has gone but the future players are there and we have to make sure they stay on the island and they get the right ­resources, the right coaching and the fundamentals around it, like we did with the sevens, so there is no reason why we can’t dominate.”Game face on: Nathan Hughes for England against his homeland of Fiji (Photo: Getty Images)The moves to include Fiji and Samoa in Super Rugby have been widely hailed as having the potential to end the Pacific Islands player drain woes. Players from the Pacific Islands or of Pacific Island descent make up around 18% of the world’s leading professional teams, but many choose to play abroad for better opportunities and pay. Charlie Faumuina of the Blues takes on the Reds defence last year (Photo: Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Rachel King Virimi Vakatawa and Nathan Hughes were both born in Fiji but have been chosen for the France and England squads respectively in the Six Nations this year, after qualifying under residency rules.Check out our Super Rugby preview in the current issue of Rugby World. Two Super Rugby fixtures are to be played in the Pacific Islands this year for the first time in the competitions history.The Waikato Chiefs hosted the Canterbury Crusaders in Suva last year, making Fiji the first island nation to take part. This year the Chiefs will return to Fiji on 19 May, facing the Crusaders again, along with another Pacific Islands fixture when the Auckland’s Blues host the Queensland Reds in Apia, Samoa on 2 June.The location change comes after it was reported last year that Ben Ryan, the English coach who guided Fiji to their gold medal in the Rio sevens, had secured £20 million of backing to establish a Super Rugby franchise in Fiji. Although Fiji’s Rugby Union said they had no knowledge of the sponsorship negotiations.Going for gold: Fiji Sevens before their Olympic semi-final against Japan (Photo: Getty Images)In an interview with the Telegraph Ryan claimed the new team could see Fiji win the World Cup one day. “We have shown in sevens what we can do. And if you just look at the impact the Fiji players are having on the tier one countries, they are their star players in New Zealand, Australia, England and France. TAGS: FijiSamoa last_img read more

Five Things We Learnt From The Rugby World Cup Final Weekend

first_imgAfter the Springboks momentous win, Paul Williams looks at five things we learnt from the weekend. Five Things We Learnt From The Rugby World Cup Final WeekendScrums aren’t ornamentsOver the past few seasons, scrums have been regarded as a messy feature from an age gone by. Like a once proud Toby Jug on a pensioner’s mantelpiece, scrums have become an afterthought that need dusting off and polishing every now and again.But as we saw in the Rugby World Cup final, scrums are the keystone of rugby, without which everything else collapses. With Kyle Sinckler leaving the field in the opening minutes, the game tipped irrevocably towards the South Africans. It would be unfair to blame the entire scrum problem on the tighthead side. England’s loosehead side also conceded its fair share of penalties.Sensational scrums: The Springboks dominated the English scrum (Getty Images)Eddie Jones tried to fix the problem with the introduction of George Kruis. But extra weight behind the props didn’t suffice. Without a scrum, England were unable to exploit Bok handling errors and perhaps more importantly, supply Manu Tuilagi with any clean phase-one ball.England were outplayed in all areas of the field, but it started and ended at the scrum. A lesson that, despite a very positive tournament, the English pack will take a long time to forget.Forwards for dough, backs for showAs much as Super Rugby fan boys like myself want 70m tries and miss-three passes to rule rugby, this RWC, as with most others, has proved that forward dominance is all that really matters. Without it you have nothing.Against the All Blacks, England dominated the gain-line and the deck, providing stacks of fast ball for their backs. That wasn’t the case against the Boks. The Boks dominated every aspect of the collision and the breakdown. Against New Zealand it looked like England had eight carriers, against the Boks it looked like they had two.Flawless Forwards: South Africa’s forward deserve all the plaudits (Getty Images)It wasn’t just in defence that the Boks excelled, Duane Vermeulen was the dominant carrier on the field. Add to that the equally faultless Pieter-Steph du Toit and England’s flankers looked like the young players that they are, instead of the 80-cap players they appeared to be the week before. Both Sam Underhill and Tom Curry have had stunning tournaments regardless.In commentary, the more you hear the names of your pack, the less likely you are to hear the names of the opposition’s backs. And that is exactly how it played out. At times it seemed as though my remote control had placed the English midfield on selective mute.The end of an eraThe third-place play-off not only saw the end of this year’s World Cup cycles for Wales and New Zealand, but it also saw the end of two rugby coaching eras. Steve Hansen and Warren Gatland may have had varying styles, and one of them may have lifted more of the big trinkets, but they are both undeniably the most successful head coaches in their nation’s histories. Whilst Hansen got to lift the World Cup twice and dominate the Rugby Championship, it is Gatland who arguably deserves more praise. He simply did more with less. When Gatland arrived, Wales had admittedly won a Grand Slam in 2005.  But the style of rugby and the structure that stood beneath was as stable as a soup pasty.Two Giants: Hansen and Gatland shake hands before the third place play-off (Getty Images)Gatland changed it all. Not only by making players fitter and more physical, but also by creating a rugby infrastructure that hopefully will last Wales another 50 years.Gatland’s tenure wasn’t without criticism of course. Whilst Hansen was moving creative rugby forward, particularly in midfield and the back three, there was a period where Wales seemed obsessed with giant backs and contact. ‘Warrenball’ was denied as even existing by the coaching staff, when to many, particularly those exposed to southern hemisphere rugby, knew that it did.However, Warrenball diluted significantly in recent seasons, and with it Gatland finished as he started – by taking Welsh rugby to levels of consistency and achievement that it hadn’t seen for 30 years.  Thankyou Mr Hansen and Mr Gatland, you’ve both changed the game for the better and that is a mark of the true greats.A win for the whole of South AfricaThe Boks’ World Cup win was massive, for any number of reasons. But the most important is beyond rugby and undoubtedly bleeds into the social and political. It is impossible to detach sport and politics in South Africa. And rightly so. The country has a long history of social and political nightmares to clean up and rugby is a key part of it.True Reflection: The South African squad seemed representative of rugby in South Africa (Getty Images)What makes this Springbok win seem different is the racial mix of the squad. Whilst things clearly aren’t perfect in South Africa in 2019, this Bok squad felt like a far truer representation of rugby in South Africa. Who could argue that Makazole Mapimpi isn’t one of the best finishers in Test rugby and arguably one of the best under the high ball? Who doesn’t think that Lukhanyo Am’s pass wasn’t one of the most ballsy plays ever seen in a World Cup final? Who doesn’t think Cheslin Kolbe is the most exciting player in the game, in any country? And who doesn’t think that Siya Kolisi now ranks up alongside Francois Pienaar as a great Springbok captain.1995 marked the start of the revolution in South African rugby and whilst the journey is nowhere near complete, it is moving in the right direction.World Rugby needs a ‘most improved category’The final week of the World Cup saw World Rugby announce the Player of the Year and Breakthrough Player of the Year nominees. All of which are well deserved. However, it does leave a big gap for mid-career players. Unless you’re the best player in the world or the best young player in the world, there is little public recognition.Test careers can stretch over 15 years, providing a large gap in which players can improve hugely. Particularly if you’re a lock or prop – just look at Cory Hill for example. Most locks or props don’t look comfortable in Test rugby until their mid-20a – players like Maro Itoje are rare. For most it takes many years to master the intricacies of scrummaging and lock play, not to mention adding the required mass. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Worthy winners: South Africa holding the trophy aloft (Getty Images) Most Improved: May has become one of the top wingers in world rugby (Getty Images)The issue doesn’t just concern players in the tight five. If there was a ‘most improved’ award, this year may have seen the likes of Jonny May get a nomination. World Rugby have enough on their plate without me making more work for them. But if they get a quiet minute…Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury: ‘If all you have is a gun,…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Lambeth Palace] In his final Thought for the Day this morning on BBC Radio 4, the Archbishop of Canterbury talks about the recent killings in Connecticut and discounts the argument often put forward that “it’s not guns that kill, it’s people” saying:“People use guns. But in a sense guns use people, too. When we have the technology for violence easily to hand, our choices are skewed and we are more vulnerable to being manipulated into violent action.”He acknowledges that “control of the arms trade, whether for individuals or for nations, won’t in itself stop the impulse to violence and slaughter” but argues that:“If all you have is a gun, everything looks like a target. If all you have is the child’s openness and willingness to be loved, everything looks like a promise. Control of the weapons trade is a start. But what will really make the difference is dealing with fear and the pressure to release our anxiety and tension at the expense of others. A new heart, a new spirit, as the Bible says; so that peace on earth won’t be an empty hope.”ENDSFull text of the Archbishop’s Thought for the Day is below:A week after the horrific killings of the schoolchildren of Sandy Hook in Connecticut, most of us are still struggling to get our minds around such a nightmare. And how do we say and sing the words of this joyful season while we think of lives cut so brutally short and of the unimaginable loss and trauma suffered by parents?Nearly 6,000 children and teenagers were killed by firearms in the USA in just two years. And we’d better not be complacent about the growing issues of gun and knife crime affecting young people in our own cities here. In the UK, the question is how we push back against gang culture by giving young people the acceptance and respect they deserve, so that they don’t look for it in destructive places. In the US, the question is, of course, about gun laws, one of the most polarising issues in American politics.And there is one thing often said by defenders of the American gun laws that ought to make us think about wider questions. ‘It’s not guns that kill, it’s people.’ Well, yes, in a sense. But it makes a difference to people what weapons are at hand for them to use – and, even more, what happens to people in a climate where fear is rampant and the default response to frightening or unsettling situations or personal tensions is violence or the threat of violence. If all you have is a hammer, it’s sometimes said, everything looks like a nail. If all you have is a gun, everything looks like a target.People use guns. But in a sense guns use people, too. When we have the technology for violence easily to hand, our choices are skewed and we are more vulnerable to being manipulated into violent action.Perhaps that’s why, in a passage often heard in church around this time of year, the Bible imagines a world where swords are beaten into ploughshares. In the new world which the newborn child of Christmas brings into being, weapons are not left to hang on the wall, suggesting all the time that the right thing to do might after all be to use them. They are decommissioned, knocked out of shape, put to work for something totally different.Control of the arms trade, whether for individuals or for nations, won’t in itself stop the impulse to to violence and slaughter. The good news of Christmas is that the atmosphere of fear and hostility isn’t the natural climate for human beings, and it can be changed.If it’s true that if all you have is a gun, everything looks like a target. If all you have is the child’s openness and willingness to be loved, everything looks like a promise. Control of the weapons trade is a start. But what will really make the difference is dealing with fear and the pressure to release our anxiety and tension at the expense of others. A new heart, a new spirit, as the Bible says; so that peace on earth won’t be an empty hope. Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Archbishop of Canterbury: ‘If all you have is a gun, everything is a target’ Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Advocacy Peace & Justice, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Gun Violence Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Archbishop of Canterbury, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Dec 23, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops ‘sent out’ for united mission

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ecumenical & Interreligious, By Gavin DrakePosted Oct 5, 2016 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops ‘sent out’ for united mission New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rome50th Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Pope Francis have commissioned 19 pairs of Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops from across the world to take part in united mission in their local areas. The bishops, selected by the International Anglican Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM) were “sent out” for mission together by the Pope and Archbishop from the same church were Pope Gregory sent Saint Augustine to evangelise the English in the sixth Century.Among the 19 pairings are Episcopal Bishop of Tennessee John Bauerschmidt and Roman Catholic Auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore Dennis Madden.Full article. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Archbishop of Canterbury, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Anglican environmental group expresses sorrow at Trump decision on Paris…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Communion Environmental Network has added its voice to those condemning President Donald Trump for deciding to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement.“We know that our brothers and sisters on every continent are already experiencing the damaging and sometimes catastrophic effects of climate change,” the network said. “We call on fellow Christians and all people of faith in the USA to hear the voices of their brothers and sisters who are already impacted by climate change. Our faith calls us to feed the hungry. Today, this means halting those actions which are causing hunger and starvation.”Full article. Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Donald Trump, Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags June 7, 2017 at 9:37 am A powerful statement regarding this key issue of our time, and a witness to ecumenical solidarity in social justice issues. Thank you! Fr. Robert Hale, O.S.B. Cam. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Faith & Politics Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Fr. Robert Hale, O.S.B. Cam. says: Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Communion, Anglican environmental group expresses sorrow at Trump decision on Paris deal Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Jun 5, 2017 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Environment & Climate Change, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

British bishop says that the church has forgotten the poor

first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishop of Burnley in the northwest England diocese of Blackburn has accused priests of deserting the nation’s poor and working class areas.In a speech at the evangelical New Wine festival, Bishop Philip North told the stories of people who had come to faith through ministry in deprived areas.Full article. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET British bishop says that the church has forgotten the poor Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (2) Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 4, 2017 at 6:47 pm This is something that I think warrants more widespread and persistent discussion in the Church. I definitely think Bishop North is on to something. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 5, 2017 at 10:03 am My community is rural – and people are often without transportation. It’s been on my heart that I need to get out there. This may be the push I need! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Aug 4, 2017 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rev. Lou Divis says: Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Poverty & Hunger The Rev. Frank J. Corbishley says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

Los primados concluyen la reunión de Cantórbery ‘renovados en su…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Episcopal News Service — Cantórbery, Inglaterra] Un espíritu positivo se ha difundido por los ámbitos de la catedral de Cantórbery esta semana mientras los primados de la mayoría de las 39 provincias de la Comunión Anglicana re reunían para abordar temas de interés común y muchos de ellos afirmaban que se sentían renovados en su ministerio.El obispo primado Michael Curry, que asistía a su segunda Reunión de los Primados, se refirió a la reunión como una “santa convocación”.“Concluimos nuestro tiempo juntos lavándonos los pies unos a otros, siguiendo la enseñanza y el ejemplo de nuestro Señor y Salvador, Jesucristo.” Dijo Curry en un mensaje videográfico a la Iglesia.“Esto no fue sólo un encuentro. Esto no fue sólo una reunión. Esto fue, como un amigo mío suele decir, una santa convocación. Nos congregamos en el nombre de nuestro Señor Jesucristo, e hicimos nuestro trabajo juntos en acuerdo y desacuerdo, siguiendo su espíritu y en su espíritu”Curry dijo que la mayor parte de lo que se debatió en la reunión se centró fuera de la Iglesia. “Pasamos la mayor parte de nuestro tiempo, para ser muy sincero, no dedicados a hablar de las cosas internas de la Iglesia, sino de las cosas externas, donde la Iglesia puede aportar su ministerio que conlleva seguir a Jesús” afirmó.Un comunicado emitido al término de la reunión del 2 al 6 de enero reiteraba  el acuciante deseo de los primados de andar juntos en unidad, a pesar de lo distante [que pudieran estar] cuando se enfrentaban con diferencias respecto a los problemas de la sexualidad humana, tales como la igualdad matrimonial, en sus respectivas provincias.El arzobispo Paul Kwong de Hong Kong dijo durante una conferencia de prensa el 6 de octubre que de las cinco reuniones de los primados a las que él había asistido esta había sido la mejor. “La mejor porque  todos los presentes eran sinceros, estaban comprometidos, fueron mutuamente francos y pude percibir que todo el mundo… se sintió edificado y… nos comprometimos no sólo a andar juntos, sino incluso a andar mucho más cerca porque tenemos un propósito para juntarnos, el propósito de tener la Comunión, que es relevante en el mundo que Dios nos ha llamado a servir”.Los primados dijeron que “respaldaban” y “proseguirían con renovado compromiso” la clara decisión de la reunión de 2016 de andar juntos, pese a reconocer la distancia que existe en nuestras relaciones debido a las profundas diferencias en entender el matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo”.El comunicado informa que los primados “reafirmaron los compromisos hechos en 2016 respecto a la comunidad LGBTI, específicamente el pesar de la Comunión por no haber apoyado previamente a las personas LGBTI y su condena de los prejuicios y la violencia homófoba”.Personas cercanas a la reunión dijeron que estaban profundamente conmovidos por las expresiones positivas de muchos primados que dijeron sentirse renovados y revitalizados  por sus experiencias de esta semana. Los primados concluyeron su comunicado resaltando que se iban de Cantórbery “enriquecidos por la comunión que compartimos y fortalecidos por el fiel testimonio de los anglicanos en todas partes”.Los primados dedicaron la mayor parte de los primeros dos días de la reunión a debatir el tema de la igualdad matrimonial y las decisiones de la Iglesia Episcopal Escocesa en junio pasado y de la Iglesia Episcopal de EE.UU. en 2015 de eliminar de sus cánones la cláusula que define el matrimonio  como siendo [contraído] entre un hombre y una  mujer.Esas decisiones han allanado el camino para que congregaciones de ambas iglesias ofrezcan ceremonias de matrimonio a parejas del mismo sexo, pero han dado lugar a una serie de consecuencias, solicitadas por los primados, que restringen a esas dos provincias de participar en organismos ecuménicos e interreligiosos, de ser nombradas o elegidas a los comités permanentes de la Comunión Anglicana y de tomar parte en la toma de decisiones sobre cualquier asunto relativo a la doctrina o a la política [de la Iglesia]. Las consecuencias se aplicaron primero a la Iglesia Episcopal [de EE.UU.] cuando los primaros se reunieron en enero de 2016 y a la Iglesia Episcopal Escocesa durante la reunión de esta semana.El comunicado de los primados reconoce también el dolor que han causado las intervenciones translimítrofes cuando un representante de una provincia o diócesis actúa en otra sin permiso. La mayoría de tales intervenciones han sido orquestadas por anglicanos desafectos y ex episcopales que han conspirado al amparo de grupos disidentes, tales como la Iglesia Anglicana de América del Norte (ACNA por su sigla en inglés) o la Conferencia Global del Futuro Anglicano.Los primados dijeron que convenían en que los principios que rigen las intervenciones translimítrofes han quedado “claramente establecidos a partir del Concilio de Nicea y en la Conferencia de Lambeth 1998”.Hay oportunidades para iniciativas conjuntas y asociaciones en la misión para beneficio del evangelio allí donde hayan sido acordadas entre las provincias, dijeron los primados en su comunicado. Sin embargo, afirmaron, el consentimiento era fundamental y es “esencial que la cortesía y el amor deban extenderse a las provincias en todo momento”.Los primados insistieron en que los intentos de abordar las rupturas del consentimiento y la cortesía debían tener lugar en las Reuniones de Primados regionales y sólo se remitirían al Secretario General y al arzobispo de Cantórbery como último recurso.“Reconocemos que la persistente y deliberada actividad translimítrofe quiebra la confianza y debilita nuestra comunión”, afirmaron. “Reconocemos que se necesita una temporada de arrepentimiento y renovación incluso donde las intervenciones puedan haber ocurrido antes de que se solicitara el permiso”.La mayoría de los personajes que habían intentado influir en las reuniones desde el margen pareciera que se han quedado fuera esta vez, sin embargo, un representante de la ACNA celebró una sesión informativa con los medios de prensa  a principios de la semana e intentó infiltrarse en la conferencia de prensa final. La policía de la Catedral lo sacó del lugar.En su comunicado, los primaros confirmaron que la ACNS no es una provincia de la Comunión Anglicana, añadiendo que “reconocemos que los que pertenecen a la ACNA deben ser tratados con amor como hermanos cristianos”.En sus constantes empeños en pro de la reconciliación, la Iglesia Episcopal ha mantenido que las puertas permanecen abiertas para el regreso de los episcopales que se hayan marchado debido a desacuerdos recientes tocante a la autoridad bíblica y la teología, sobre todo en lo que respecta a la plena inclusión de las mujeres y de las personas LGBT en la vida de la Iglesia.Tres primados —el arzobispo Nicholas Okoh de Nigeria, el arzobispo Onesphore Rwaje de Ruanda y el arzobispo Stanley Ntagali de Uganda— no asistieron a la Reunión de los Primados de esta semana debido a los acontecimientos en la Iglesia Episcopal en EE.UU. y en la Iglesia Episcopal Escocesa.Otros tres —el arzobispo Sturdie Downs de Centroamérica, el arzobispo Jacob Chimeledya de Tanzania y el arzobispo Stephen Than Myint Oo de Myanmar— estuvieron ausentes de la reunión  debido a un mezcla de problemas prácticos y de salud así como de asuntos internos de sus países, según la Oficina de la Comunión Anglicana.En otros asuntos, los primados debatieron estrategias de evangelización y discipulado a través de las 39 provincias autónomas de la Comunión Anglicana, y dirimieron preocupaciones acerca de la persecución de minorías religiosas, refugiados y migración. También escucharon testimonios de sus colegas acerca del cambio climático y sus preocupaciones de cómo el medio ambiente estaba afectando sus provincias.El deán de Cantórbery, Muy Rdo. Robert Willis, dirigió a los primados en un recorrido nocturno con velas por la catedral, que se detuvo en el sitio donde está grabada en el suelo la Rosa Náutica (símbolo de la Comunión Anglicana), en el lugar del martirio del arzobispo de Cantórbery del siglo XII Thomas Becket  y en la capilla de los Santos y Mártires, que conmemora a mártires cristianos más recientes de todas partes del mundo.El arzobispo Moon Hing del Asia Sudoriental, uno de los 16 nuevos primados nombrados o elegidos desde la anterior Reunión de los Primados en enero de 2016, dijo a Anglican Communion New Service  que él había leído muchísimos comentarios en las redes sociales de que la reunión era una pérdida de tiempo. “Pero luego, cuando vine, me di cuenta de que todos nosotros los primados estamos realmente muy solos. Y es realmente una buena ocasión para alentarnos mutuamente… Hay todo un grupo de nosotros que estamos haciendo lo mismo, y luchando de la misma manera, y a veces clamando [a Dios] y llamándole.“No estamos solos. Hay otros. Y ahora podemos conectarnos unos con otros y podemos realmente edificar  sobre la mutua resistencia y compensarnos mutuamente las debilidades. Eso es maravilloso’.¿Quiénes son los primados y qué es la Reunión de los Primados?Las provincias y primados de la Comunión Anglicana aparecen listados aquí.— Matthew Davies es director de publicidad y del servicio en la Red para la Iglesia Episcopal. La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg, jefa de redacción interina de Episcopal News Service, y Anglican Communion News Service colaboraron en este artículo. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Releasecenter_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Primates Meeting 2017 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Primates Meeting, Por Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 9, 2017 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Los primados concluyen la reunión de Cantórbery ‘renovados en su ministerio’ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Submit an Event Listing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more