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Women Count. So It Is Time to Count Women.

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 17, 2010June 20, 2017By: Jill Sheffield, Founder and President, Women DeliverClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is soliciting reactions from the maternal health community to the newly released UN MMR data. Our hope is that, together, these comments will serve as a springboard for discussion and provide momentum towards MDG5.There’s no doubt that this is excellent news. The new UN maternal mortality figures further confirm the trend that the IHME data suggested earlier this year: there is a global downward trend in maternal mortality. Who could be disappointed with that? Our hard work over the past decades is paying off.But great news doesn’t detract from the persistent need for good, accurate, and real-time data in the maternal health field. Figures we have are estimates based, for many countries, on low-quality and incomplete data, or they are numbers derived from data models.The estimates provide us with an important but sketchy picture of maternal mortality worldwide, because it is so often difficult to obtain accurate, comprehensive data on this issue. Many deaths aren’t counted because they occur in places where there is no system to track them — poor and rural villages or ill-equipped clinics — or because the women dying are those most marginalized and neglected by their communities. Too often, they simply do not count.While every bit of new data helps us understand this epidemic we have been fighting, we need to continue demanding excellence of ourselves and others in delivering good, solid data. We need more rigorous systems of monitoring and evaluation at the local, national, and regional levels, and to better emphasize the importance of data — what accurate and timely figures enable us to know, do, and solve.To those of us in the field, it couldn’t be any clearer that women are the cornerstone of their families, communities, and economies. They drive economic development and they nurture our future generation. While we continue to push for implementing proven solutions —like universal access to family planning, safe abortion services, and skilled care before, during, and after childbirth — our message should be clear: every woman counts, and therefore should be counted.Visit www.womendeliver.orgto learn more!Share this:last_img

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